Saturday, December 16, 2017

How About Some OTR...(Old Time Radio)?

Again today, we are doing something a bit different. Radio programs from long ago!

I used to listen to some of these programs when I was a young kid and didn't realize I could still find them on Youtube today! How cool is that?



They have some good old westerns on there as well, like gunsmoke, Paladin, and many others. Check it out, why don't cha?

Coffee in the kitchen again today.

Friday, December 15, 2017

Glenn Miller Disappears...!

It was a sad day for his many fans the world over, and even today the true fate of what happened to him is still unknown.

As of this minute, here is what we know for sure. This information comes from History.com.

1944
Legendary bandleader Glenn Miller disappears over the English Channel

General James Doolittle of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), hero of the daring “Doolittle Raid” on mainland Japan and later the unified commander of Allied air forces in Europe in World War II, offered the following high praise to one of his staff officers in 1944: “Next to a letter from home, Captain Miller, your organization is the greatest morale builder in the European Theater of Operations.” The Captain Miller in question was the trombonist and bandleader Glenn Miller, the biggest star on the American pop-music scene in the years immediately preceding World War II and a man who set aside his brilliant career right at its peak in 1942 to serve his country as leader of the USAAF dance band. It was in that capacity that Captain Glenn Miller boarded a single-engine aircraft at an airfield outside of London on December 15, 1944—an aircraft that would go missing over the English Channel en route to France for a congratulatory performance for American troops that had recently helped to liberate Paris.

It would be difficult to overstate the magnitude of Glenn Miller’s success in the years immediately proceeding America’s entry into World War II. Though he was a relatively unspectacular instrumentalist himself—he’d played the trombone in various prominent orchestras but never distinguished himself as a performer—Miller the bandleader came to dominate the latter portion of the swing era on the strength of his disciplined arrangements and an innovation in orchestration that put the high-pitched clarinet on the melody line doubled by the saxophone section an octave below. This trademark sound helped the Glenn Miller Orchestra earn an unprecedented string of popular hits from 1939 to 1942, including the iconic versions of numbers like “In The Mood” (1939), “Tuxedo Junction” (1939) and “Chattanooga Choo Choo” (1941), as well as Miller’s self-penned signature tune, “Moonlight Serenade” (1939).

The Glenn Miller Orchestra played its last-ever concert under Miller’s direction on September 27, 1942, in Passaic, New Jersey, and shortly thereafter, Miller entered the Army. After nearly two years spent stateside broadcasting a weekly radio program called I Sustain The Wings out of New York City, Miller formed a new 50-piece USAAF dance band and departed for England in the summer of 1944, giving hundreds of performances to Allied troops over the next six months before embarking on his fateful trip to France on this day in 1944.

The wreckage of Miller’s plane was never found. His official military status remains Missing in Action.

My folks loved Glenn MIller music. I am still very fond of it myself, and have several recordings of his around here somewhere.

Coffee inside once more. I'm baking bread today, so the smell is terrific!

Thursday, December 14, 2017

The Legend Of Shiprock...!

The very name of this natural wonder conjures up all sorts of images in the mind, doesn't it?

As bold as the images are, the legend is even more striking. Here is a brief story of the legendary Shiprock.

Shiprock

Legends surround this jagged rock formation in the New Mexico desert.



Rising high above the surrounding desert, the rock formation known as Shiprock has long been a point of fascination.

This striking volcanic plume was formed around 30 million years ago, developing as a plug within the vent of an active volcano. Over time, the rest of the volcano eroded away, leaving the jagged outcrop all alone in a vast expanse of plain. At over 1500 feet, it’s the tallest structure for miles and miles.

The structure is an epicenter of legend within the Navajo culture. Called Tsé Bitʼaʼí or “the rock with wings,” myth says that the Shiprock was a piece of land that became a bird, carrying the ancestral people of the Navajo on its back. At sundown, the enormous creature settled in its current desert location and promptly turned back to stone. The newly-arrived people settled on the rock’s peak, leaving only to collect food and water. However, one day the outcrop was unexpectedly struck by lightning, stranding members of the tribe among its shards. Since then, the rock has been forbidden to people, who may disturb the ghostly spirits of those left behind.

Although the steep, perilous sides of the Shiprock were once considered a great prize among rockclimbers, human ascents have been expressly off-limits since 1970, in accordance with Navajo custom.

Once again Nature furnishes a beautiful scenic wonder. How can we ever get tired of all the beautiful surroundings we have here on our little planet?

Coffee inside again this morning. Chocolate chip cookies are fresh.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Joseph Walker On Western Wednesday...!

When we think of the mountain men in our history, we should not forget Joseph Walker.

Here is a bit of history about Walker you might find interesting.

1798
Joseph Walker born in Tennessee

Joseph Reddeford Walker, one of the greatest trailblazing mountain men and the first Anglo-American to see Yosemite, is born in Tennessee.

Although he had little formal education, Walker was an exceptionally intelligent explorer and leader, possessing an extraordinary ability to read and remember the geography and topography of uncharted regions. When he was 20 years old, Walker joined an illegal hunting and trapping expedition into the Mexican-controlled territory in the southern Rocky Mountains. Arrested by the Mexican authorities, Walker served a brief prison term in Santa Fe, but then turned the situation to his favor by helping the Mexicans in their war against Pawnee raiders, earning rare trading privileges as a reward.

Walker’s journeys into the relatively unexplored far western regions of the continent began in 1832 when he met Captain Benjamin Bonneville, who asked him to join his trapping and trading expedition into the West. The following year, Walker, probably at the behest of Bonneville, embarked on a daring journey west into the Mexican province of Alta California, a feat that had only been accomplished by two other Anglos, Jedediah Smith and Peter Ogden. Ignoring the trails blazed by his predecessors, Walker instead led a small group of men on a new route through the Sierras that proved far more challenging than expected, and at several points the explorers were reduced to eating their horses to stay alive. But after crossing the Continental Divide on November 13, 1833, Walker and his men were rewarded with an amazing sight that no Anglo-American had ever before seen: the mighty redwoods and majestic waterfalls of the Yosemite Valley. Later in life, every man in the troop recalled that day of discovery as among the greatest of his life.

In subsequent years, Walker continued to use his voluminous knowledge of western geography as an employee of the American Fur Company and as a guide for explorers like John C. Fremont. He also led countless emigrant parties to California. His wide-ranging travels took him all the way north to the headwaters of the Missouri in Montana and led to memorable partnerships and adventures with other famous trailblazers like Kit Carson and Jim Bridger. When he finally settled down on his California ranch in 1867, nearly blind and approaching 70 years old, the intrepid mountain man remembered a single day as the best of his life, and asked that a remembrance of it be carved on his tombstone: “Camped at Yosemite, Nov. 13, 1833.”

I can only imagine what these brave men thought when they viewed the mighty redwoods for the first time. Had to be mind blowing, to say the least.

Coffee inside the kitchen again today. Still a bit chilly outside.

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

The Grinch And Tony The Tiger...!

With Christmas right around the corner, I figured you might enjoy a little yuletide trivia.

This is one of those almost useless facts I have found when searching sites like Listverse, which can always be counted on to have some fun facts about all kinds of stuff.

Tony The Tiger Sang ‘You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch’



Boris Karloff famously narrated the Dr. Seuss classic, How The Grinch Stole Christmas. But the horror film veteran had a little secret—he couldn’t sing. Instead, the production team called on voice actor Thurl Ravenscroft to handle the musical numbers. Ravenscroft’s singing was unknown for years, because he did not receive a credit on the telecast, leading many to believe it was Karloff who knocked the song out of the park.

Ravenscroft might not be a famous name to you, but you surely know his voice. He voiced characters on Disney rides and shows (including Buff from the Country Bears Jamboree) but is best recalled for his TV work. He played “Tony The Tiger” for Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes TV commercials. You’ll never hear “they’re grrrrrrreat!” again without thinking of the Grinch.

There are actually two versions of “Mr. Grinch”, both of which get air play today. The original TV version features sound effects of crashes and booms (as the Grinch moves through the homes and liberates Christmas gifts). If you hear the sound effects version, that’s the version lifted from the show. The clean version was intended for radio play.

Some things are best left unknown, I reckon. I never would have known if I had not found the article.

Coffee in the kitchen again. Another cold front on the way.

Monday, December 11, 2017

Dark Mysteries For Monday...!

I found some mysterious things on a video from Youtube that you might enjoy today.



Did you enjoy that? I figured you might.

Coffee inside again, but I made peanut butter fudge and fresh chocolate chip cookies to share.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Really Old 'Toons For Sunday...

When I say old, I mean some of these are even older than I am...and that's pretty old!

Not very funny by today's standards, but considering how long they have been around we'll overlook that, right?







And one more for good measure.



As you can probably guess, these old 'toons were silent and black and white. They were later set to music and colorized. Interesting, huh!

Coffee inside again. Fresh cookies to go along with the coffee!