Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Treasure For Western Wednesday...!

Seems sort of strange to have a treasure story for Wednesday, but since it does relate to to the early days I think it's fitting.

This might be a bit of history that you didn't know. It's certainly something I never thought of.

Treasure At Little Bighorn



For many Americans in the late 1800s, traveling west and striking it rich by finding gold didn’t seem like an absurd idea. Some didn’t even make it all the way to the Pacific. A few men struck it rich when they found gold in Montana. When fewer and fewer men found gold in Middle America, more and more of them continued west. But they probably should have kept looking.

According to some experts, Captain Grant Marsh was in charge of the Far West, a steamboat making its way up the Bighorn River to resupply General George Custer in his fight against the Indians. When Captain Marsh heard of General Custer’s defeat and found out he would have to take injured men away from the battlefield, the only thing he could do to keep the ship from sinking under the weight of so many injured men was to bury the $375,000 worth of gold bars on the shores of the Bighorn River. Some say that Marsh had collected the gold bars from worried gold miners who didn’t want to be attacked by the Sioux.

If you like, you can read more about this "hidden gold" right here! Always fun to think about these things!

Coffee out on the patio this morning. How about some biscuits and gravy?

9 comments:

Chickenmom said...

Good mystery - wonder how many people did go look for it. They are probably buried under a parking lot by now. Love your biscuits and gravy!

Sunnybrook Farm said...

Seems a bit far fetched.
The real gold treasure of the little big horn would be to find Custer's blond scalp!

Rob said...

I have to wonder when were talking about Custer's defeat & injured men, no wounded solders from that battle.

linda m said...

Seems a little "fishy" to me. I thought all the soldiers except one were massacred. Finding Custer's scalp would be a real "coup" hahaha. Very muggy and hot here this morning. Have a nice day.

Ian H said...

Coffee sounds good, and I will bring my shovel!

JO said...

No this story doesn't add up. Or was there another battle he lost?

Biscuits and gravy with fresh coffee and good friends! Here I come.

HermitJim said...

Hey Phyllis...
Like most stories of hidden treasure, I'm sure this one attracted many a seeker!

Biscuits and gravy are hard to beat!

Thanks for coming over today!



Hey Sunnybrook...
Not a pretty sight, I would imagine!

Thanks for coming over!



Hey Rob...
Custer split his soldiers into 3 groups. One lead by Custer, the other two lead by Captain Benteen and Major Reno. Those two groups were forced to retreat.

General Terry found the survivors and wounded and took 54 men to the steamboat Far West to be evacuated.

Thanks for coming over today!



Hey Linda...
If you read the comment above, that might explain it better. Custer had split his me into three groups.

I appreciate the visit today!



Hey Ian...
We might need more than just one!

Thanks for dropping in today!



Hey Jo...
Out of the three groups of soldiers, only the group lead by Custer were surrounded and killed. Some of the others retreated to the other side of the river and fought from there.

Thanks, sweetie, for coming over today!

JO said...

OK still worth reading about all of it. Thanks for the info My Friend.

Beatrice P. Boyd said...

What say we all get shovels and head out to look for that gold? Sorry, but will pass on the biscuits and gravy but OK on the coffee, HJ.