Sunday, May 15, 2011

Could This Happen Again...?


Sounds pretty crazy, doesn't it?

But let's face it! Stranger things have happened! I can't help but wonder if, given the current world situation and crazy weather patterns, if something like this is possible!

I wouldn't be surprised if one day some of the politicians started hinting at a similar program just "for our own good!" After all, remember that this action, though thought of as necessary, was not that long ago!

Just a little something to think about, ya know?

On this day in 1942, gasoline rationing began in 17 Eastern states as an attempt to help the American war effort during World War II. By the end of the year, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had ensured that mandatory gasoline rationing was in effect in all the states.

America had been debating its entrance into World War II until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The following day, Congress almost unanimously approved Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war against Japan and three days later Japan's allies Germany and Italy declared war against the United States. On the home front, ordinary Americans almost immediately felt the impact of the war, as the economy quickly shifted from a focus on consumer goods into full-time war production. As part of this transformation, women went to work in the factories to replace enlisted men, automobile factories began producing tanks and planes for Allied forces and households were required to limit their consumption of such products as rubber, gasoline, sugar, alcohol and cigarettes.

Rubber was the first commodity to be rationed, after the Japanese invasion of the Dutch East Indies cut off the U.S. supply; the shortage of rubber affected the availability of products such as tires. Rationing gasoline, it was reasoned, would conserve rubber by reducing the number of miles Americans drove. At first, the government urged voluntary gasoline rationing, but by the spring of 1942 it had become evident that these efforts were insufficient. In mid-May, the first 17 states put mandatory gasoline rationing into effect, and by December, controls were extended across the entire country.

Ration stamps for gasoline were issued by local boards and pasted to the windshield of a family or individual's automobile. The type of stamp determined the gasoline allotment for that automobile. Black stamps, for example, signified non-essential travel and mandated no more than three gallons per week, while red stamps were for workers who needed more gas, including policemen and mail carriers. As a result of the restrictions, gasoline became a hot commodity on the black market, while legal measures of conserving gas--such as carpooling--also flourished. In a separate attempt to reduce gas consumption, the government passed a mandatory wartime speed limit of 35 mph, known as the "Victory Speed."

Never know exactly what crazy thoughts are lurking in the minds of some of these politicos! Never let your guard down, I say!

Want some fresh coffee on the patio? Pretty nice morning for it!

19 comments:

thecottagebythecranelakeolof1 said...

We had petrol rationing in the seventies here when the arab states stopped deliver petrol. But I guess this will happen in the future as well.
I think we in Europe might be a bit more prepared since we usually have smaller cars that doesn´t use that much petrol. From what I know You still have rather big cars in the US.

But cars driven on other fuels are becoming more common over here now, electric, gas and ethanol is quite common now. But I doubt they´ll have to ration petrol since we already pays 8,4 US dollars per gallon :-) :-)

Have a great day now!
Christer.

HermitJim said...

Hey Christer...
The Americans have always had a love affair with the automobile. It seems that the bigger gas guzzlers have always been the favorites.

Let's hope some of the alternate fuel autos edo well enough to make a difference!

Thanks for coming by today!

Gorges Smythe said...

Just a plug for the gas guzzler: 1st, it takes a bigger car to haul our fat American _sses - 2nd, they're safer in a crash. I'm glad I've got one. I'd rather lessen my miles than ride in a tin-can.

Sixbears said...

We did that dance to a different beat in the 70s. One of the things I noticed was gas stations would close at night. It was very hard to drive across the country non-stop. I'd look to fill up at the last station open at night and try and find one open in the morning. Didn't always work. Sometimes I napped waiting for them to open.

Dizzy-Dick said...

Yep, I remember what sixbears was talking about. Now, with a motor-home, rationing would hurt real bad, unless they allow 50 gallons or so a day (grin).

Bob from Athens said...

Three gallons a day, well a lot of people around here couldn't even make it to town and back on that. Sleeping bags in the back seat and parked in the Wal Mart parking lot overnight, oh swell.

JoJo said...

WOW I might have to live up here in the mountains for ever. :) That wouldn't hurt to bad except for when it snowed and the temps dropped down to below something. NO I will go donw the mountain one way or the other.
Coffee with you on any morning is a delight.

SHARON said...

Hermit, my friend, buddy, chum, fellow cat lover and fellow blogger. I love your blog, and I'm sure you're a great guy. But there were only 48 states during WWII. Alaska and Hawaii didn't come on board until 1959.

Phelan said...

I need my gas guzzler because of my livestock and feed. However we have the motorcycles for our other commutes, like getting into town. 2 gallons for the bikes and save a gallon to put into the truck until it is needed.

I think we could do it though I wouldn't be a happy camper. Now if I got a side car, maybe I could get a cow into it. hhmmmm. . . .

HermitJim said...

Hey Gorges...
I drive a big full size pick-up and I'm sure I would not really want to swap it out for a tiny auto just for the gas mileage.

I really don't do that much driving, though. Like you say...I would rather cut back than swap! I need the clearance for the high water that Houston gets during the hurricanes!

Thanks for coming by today!


Hey Sixbears...
Amazing what we can get used to when we are forced into it!

Worse thing about it...is the higher prices we would have to pay for food and such!

Thanks, buddy, for coming by today!

HermitJim said...

Hey Dizzy...
That would certainly hurt the RV'ers a lot! Sort of put an end to motor home trips!

Let's just hope it doesn't come again soon!

Thanks for coming by today!


Hey Bob...
Not a pleasant thought, is it? Not that far-fetched, I guess!

Evacuations from the Texas coast during a hurricane would certainly be interesting!

Thanks, Bob, for coming by today!


Hey JoJo...
You would have to save your gas for that trip down the mountain, or back up again!

Let's just pretend it won't come to that!

Still, I can see you living there all the time!

Thanks, sweetie, for coming by today!

HermitJim said...

Hey Sharon...
That's what I get for NOT proof reading stuff I get from the History.com folks!

Thanks for pointing it out, and I have corrected the error!

I'll try and do better!

Thanks for coming by today!


Hey Phelan...
I couldn't help but grin at the image I got in my head of you driving a cow around in a sidecar!

Not too handy for hauling hay or feed, I would imagine!

I appreciate you coming by today!

Bob from Athens said...

Around here a lot of the transportation would go back to the one horse or mule power type. Wonder how the powers that b would try to regulate them?

Bob Mc said...

Might not be as far off as you think. They are making noises about a tax on the number of miles driven.

HermitJim said...

Hey Bob from Athens...
You can bet they would find a way! That's what they do best!

Thanks again for coming by!


Hey Bob...
I was wondering just how they would enforce that one? Reckon they would have like a mileage police?

Makes you wonder, for sure!

Thanks for the visit today!

Beatrice P. Boyd said...

Hey HJ, finally got through to leave a comment! It's not that I don't read your posts, just can't seem to get the comments area to display most times at home. Now that we're on a road trip and currently in NC it's working - go figure! Interesting story on rationing, but like yourself I will keep my Jeep and drive less. Living in a small town there are not a lot of temptations and the most driving I do in a week is to go to the local YMCA.

Argentum Vulgaris said...

Hi Jim, everything I read about petroleum and gasoline points exactly to the possibility of it all happening again, and worse, it is forseeable that there simply won't be gasoline for the public not so far in the future. The world is going to become a very different place.

AV

HermitJim said...

Hey Beatrice...
Sorry you have been having trouble commenting, but Blogger has been acting strange as of late!

I do appreciate the visits all the same!

Guess we will just have to wait and see! Hwy, I really do thank you for coming by today!

HermitJim said...

Hey AV...
I'm thinking that whatever happens will be a lot different than we have ever seen before!

Makes me shudder to think about it! It is indeed a totally different world coming on!

Many thanks for coming by today, my friend!