Friday, March 12, 2010

Don't Forget The Apples...!


We have a really important day coming up that you don't want to forget!

I'm talking about our historical friend Johnny Appleseed! We all have heard about him, but how much do we really know about this character? Actually, quite a bit!

Here are a couple of historical facts about this true pioneer of the modern day nurseries!

March 11—Johnny Appleseed Day
Celebrating John Chapman, legendary American pioneer and folk hero who planted apple trees across the American frontier. Chapman’s birthday is on September 26, but Johnny Appleseed Day is celebrated today.

From the Ohio History Central...here is a little more history of the character we all know as Johnny Appleseed!

John Chapman
Also known as Johnny Appleseed

John Chapman was born on September 26, 1774, in Leominster, Massachusetts. Chapman is better known as Johnny Appleseed. Beginning in 1802, Chapman began to wander through Pennsylvania and eventually Ohio planting apple nurseries. He was known as being somewhat of an eccentric. Chapman opposed violence of all sorts towards both humans and animals. He was a strict vegetarian. He also primarily wore discarded clothing or would barter some apple saplings for used clothes. Chapman believed firmly in Emanuel Swedenborg's teachings and probably was the most famous of the Swedenborgians.

Chapman spent most of his time in Ohio in Richland County near Mansfield. At one point during the War of 1812, Mansfield residents feared an Indian attack. Chapman immediately went to Mount Vernon for assistance. Chapman risked his own life to summon aid for his neighbors in Richland County. This willingness to suffer for others was a trait Chapman exhibited throughout his life. Many of Ohio's first orchards began with saplings from Chapman's nurseries. His trees fed many of Ohio's early white settlers as they struggled to establish farms and homes on the frontier. Johnny Appleseed eventually owned more than 1,200 acres of land across Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. He died near Fort Wayne, Indiana, in the early 1840s.


Now, a lot of places are having apples on sale right now! I'm sure it's just coincidental, but you never know! Why not pick up some at the store next time you go there? Tasty, healthy, and they are a very good treat for the kids...if you have any! If you don't have kids...then you could bake me an apple pie. I don't mind a bit!

OK, my friends, let's get some fresh coffee and sit outside on the patio for a bit. Here...have an apple!

21 comments:

Ken said...

...impressive !...didn't know the majority of that,always a pleasure to learn sumthin'...as fer apples,they're a staple in this house,i love baked apples...love apple dumplings too,pie is always good of course...apples(and bananas,i like bananas too)are perfect foods...(maybe not after i sweetin'em up fer cooking...lol)

HermitJim said...

Hey Ken...
You know me! Just a warehouse of almost useless information!

It is pretty interesting, though...isn't it?

hey, buddy...thanks for coming by today!

The cottage by the Cranelake said...

I have actully heard about him over here too. But I had no idea he was Swedenborgian. I think that is the only sect that origins from my little country :-) :-)

Have a great day now!
Christer.

LizBeth said...

I didn't know about his going to Mount Vernon. That's interesting. Thanks! ~Liz

Momlady said...

Interesting factoids you come up with. I'd bake you pie, but they don't travel well. Have a golden delicious day.

JoJo said...

Good Morning My Special One,
Great story. Now my mouth is watering for some baked apple anything with a good cup.

Kyddryn said...

I like McIntosh apples best, although Honeycrisps are lovely, too. Granny Smith is a welcome staple around Casa de Crazy.

Hey, Mister Hermit, sir...when I was a kid, we'd play Johnny Appleseed by wearing tin pots on our heads (he has one for a hat, in the folklore) and scatter our apple seeds in the dirt. Never had a tree come up, but we always hoped. We picked apples in the fall, too, wandering the local orchard looking for just the right ones, and made apple sauce and pressed our own cider with 'em.

Maybe I'll make an apple and brown sugar coffee cake this weekend...

Shade and Sweetwater,
K

HermitJim said...

Hey Christer...
I thought you might find it interesting to hear about this guy!

Considered by many to be the founding father of our nursery system, he was pretty important, even though not well known.

Hey buddy, thanks so much for coming by today!


Hey LizBeth...
Sometimes the truth gets a little lost in the legend. It's up to us to fid out all we can, and separate the facts from the fiction!

Glad you found this interesting...and glad you could come by today!


Hey Momlady...
Glad to be of service, my lady! Just trying to do my part to entertain and amuse, ya know?

Guess that would be a long trip for a pie...and I'm not sure how the goods would survive the taste testing...I mean, the inspections!

Nice thought, though!

I appreciate the visit today!


Hey JoJo...
Anything apple does sound good to go with the coffee this morning, doesn't it?

Maybe we should have some ried apple pies? Sounds good to me!

Thanks, Sweetie, for stopping by today!

HermitJim said...

Hey K...
Sounds like a plan to me! I'd come over for a bit of that, but with the weather trying to decide what to do...maybe I should wait a while!

Never been apple picking, but it sounds like something I should do!

Thanks for coming by today!

Eliot said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Eliot said...

Don't forget the Appleseed Project! http://www.appleseedinfo.org/

HermitJim said...

Hey Eliot...Thanks for he reminder!

Marie said...

Thanks for so much information that I didn't know. Makes sense that the trees helped people who were struggling if he planted them ahead and they had time to grow enough to produce fruit, though it hadn't occurred to me before. Makes me wish I had an apple tree... :)

HermitJim said...

Hey Marie...
I'm sure that those fruit bearing trees were a welcome sight to many a traveler! If nothing else, it could add to a meager diet...

Thanks for the visit today...

upinak said...

I am so jealous!

I still have 3 1/2 ft of snow as we just had a blizzard.

The apples we get up here are, less to be desired.

HermitJim said...

Hey Upinak...
Sorry to hear about your blizzard! Maybe you could get someone to send you a box of apples, straight from the tree! Wouldn't that be a good thing?

I do appreciate you coming by today!

Dafthermit said...

Hi Jim

wonderful story about a true gent

many thanks my friend for your kind words about my posts

as always it is a pleasure to see you have visited us in the wee tin can

peace and light from bonnie Scotland

Dafthermit said...

Hi Jim

wonderful story about a true gent

many thanks my friend for your kind words about my posts

as always it is a pleasure to see you have visited us in the wee tin can

peace and light from bonnie Scotland

Dafthermit said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mechanic in Illinois said...

I can always count on you for good info and good food. In boy scouts apples were one of our staples. And mom always made the best apple pie when I was growing up. I have apple trees in my yard and I can hardly wait for the next crop. Take care and thanks for another great posting.

HermitJim said...

Hey Mechanic...
I think that the Good Lord created apples with kis in mind! They just seem to go together!

I can remember wrapping apples in tin foil and baking them in the dutch oven...what a treat!

Thanks for coming by today...I appreciate it!